It’s mandatory to keep sound document-retention policy these days! As an HR professional, you know that the sheer volume of paperwork that you contend with is overwhelming at best and uncontrollable at worst. What’s more, if just one imperative document is lost, misfiled, or accidentally damaged, your organization could end up on the wrong side of a lawsuit. And you’re the one who will have to clarify what happened. Keeping all the laws and recordkeeping requirements straight can seem like a full-time HR job. All HR functions have federal recordkeeping requirements – from recruitment and selection, to hiring and onboarding, to compensation and benefits, to employee relations (policy administration and disciplinary actions) and training. Why You Should Attend: Employers should know how long to keep or destroy employee records and documents. Each state and federal agency has a different set of requirements, often covering the same documents so it’s challenging for you to know what to keep and for how long. These issues, as well as new identity theft threats and updated technology, impact your recordkeeping practices in a big way. This webinar will guide you through those requirements so you understand how to ensure compliance and understand the consequences of noncompliance. The webinar will also outline record retention requirements and notification requirements for several federal laws. By following the requirements, your institution should be able to avoid the pitfalls in employment-related liabilities and problems, if and when auditors investigate your files. Objectives of the Presentation: Review the recordkeeping requirements of key employment laws to get familiar with the basic rules Is there a legal requirement for keeping this document? What laws come into play regarding your obligations to manage personnel records? In what form must a document be stored? Electronically? In its original paper form? How long should I keep this document if I think its usefulness is over – and how can I know that for sure? How to effectively weed out what you no longer need to retain — and why keeping everything can be just as dangerous as keeping nothing at all Best practices for backing up and destroying employment records so you don’t compromise any sensitive, personal data How to make your recordkeeping system easy to track and use, regardless of whether you keep a paper or electronic trail Tips for making a smooth paper to e-records filing system transition How to respond in the event the DOL, EEOC, or another federal or state agency comes knocking to investigate your recordkeeping practices Policies employees must follow, consequences of not following them, and documentation required to substantiate your actions Areas Covered in the Session : Introduction highlighting the importance of records and notices and discussion on retention, storage, and destruction of records Understanding of the new reporting requirements and compliance schedule Record retention systems that work best for compliance with changing requirements Discussion on other tasks that require complete and accurate documentation Understand notice requirements to be aware of what notices need to be posted and how to post them in compliance with the laws Case studies on documentation Overview of basic documents in several federal employment laws – Importance of documentation in defending Title VII cases What information does the government require you to keep for overtime cases How to use documentation to prove FLSA exemptions Documents and notification for FMLA and ADA leave Documentation in defend trade secrets act Who Should Attend: Payroll Departments Human resource recordkeeping and maintenance Compliance Officers CFOs Office Managers Company Presidents Employers and Business Owners Hiring Managers HR Managers/Supervisors Risk Managers Potential Managers Department Heads HR Professionals Employee Benefits Professionals

Human resources analytics is a very hot area in HR today. Many HR professionals think it is new but it has been employed since the 90’s. Basically, analytics is a combination of analysis and statistics and unlike metrics which are data from the past; analytics is the use of data to make predictions about the future. This webinar will detail how, with the right data and skills, an HR professional can: Make predictions on which applicant will be a better worker Anticipate when people will quit and hire a replacement faster Forecast staffing needs Identify training programs that have the greatest impact on improving employee performance Learning Objectives: Difference between analytics and metrics How to pick high-powered metrics What comes after establishing metrics How analytics can be used to significantly help the business Case studies to demonstrate real-life projects How to develop an analytic model Data needed and how to use Excel to develop analytic formulas Using analytics in a selection process, the biggest opportunity in the HR area Areas Covered in the Session : Data needed to do analytics Skills and software needed to do analytics How to use analytics in the selection process How to use analytics in identifying high-leverage training programs How to use analytics to reduce absenteeism How to use analytics to forecast workforce changes Kinds of data needed for certain projects Real case study examples of how analytics created success for the business Who Should Attend: HR Professionals Organization Development professionals Recruiters and Hiring Managers Compensation professionals CEO’s and CFO’s Department Managers, Team Leads and Supervisors Training Managers Planning and Audit Managers Business Analysts and Risk Managers

Most employers care greatly for providing a safe place to work for their employees and want to provide safe working conditions, which includes providing appropriate worker’s compensation benefits in the case of an occupational injury or illness. In the event of an accident in the workplace, employers are required to perform a thorough, objective, professional investigation. When any workplace accident occurs, some degree of confusion follows. In the event of an accident with injury, if the accident investigation does not support the details of the injury, it may also be necessary to review the validity of any related worker’s compensation claim(s). Such a review can uncover previously undetermined details regarding the reason for the accident. Such circumstances warrant a review from those who run responsible companies. Good accident investigation procedures can heighten safety awareness on a daily basis and cause safety to be at the front of everyone’s mind every day. Such best practices include good processes for reviewing worker’s compensation claims. The presence of effective safety investigation protocols lessens the probability of an accident occurring as unsafe conditions can be discovered before an accident can occur. The presence of solid worker’s compensation investigation protocols lessens the likelihood of dubious worker’s compensation claims occurring. Agenda The interplay between OHSA and Workers Compensation How safety, accident and WC investigations differ from other types of HR related investigations Understanding how the psychology of emergencies affects effective evidence collection and accident investigations Policies, procedures and protocols to have in place today to avoid WC claim problems later Indicators of professional investigations Signs that a WC claim may be questionable or exaggerated How to handle dubious WC claims What to do when employees offer conflicting information regarding another employee’s WC claim. How to take a complaint How to interview witnesses What to do when people will not cooperate Report writing tips Who You Should Attend: HR Departments Payroll Departments Compensation Departments Safety Professionals Internal Investigators

This program contains potential life-saving information. You learn skills and tactics to recognize, respond and mitigate harm when confronting a gunman engaged in a shooting rampage. You’ll learn about history and current trends of workplace shootings. We’ll look at various shooting events and discuss what happened and the lessons learned. Pre-incident indications of potential shootings and how to recognize that a shooting is underway will be discussed. It takes from 30 seconds to a minute for most people to recognize the sounds of a shooting event. Knowing how to quickly recognize the acoustic indications of firearm discharges can provide valuable time to protect yourself or other people. Making good decisions when facing life-threatening situations is critical, yet difficult. This webinar will explore the decision-making strategies used by military and law enforcement professionals when under fire. Run! Hide! Fight! will be known by many. You learn various methods for doing them in the most effective manner. When the police arrive you may still be in danger. We’ll look at what the police will and won’t be doing and how they want you to behave. First aid for shooting victims (yourself and others) will be covered. Why You Should Attend: You may know that workplace shooting events are extremely quick, generally within two to five minutes. But did you know that on an average, it takes the police 18 minutes to respond? Being prepared with a pre-planned active shooter response could be the difference between surviving and not surviving. If you boarded an airliner and the flight attendant announced, “We’re going to skip the safety briefing on this flight because airline fatalities are so rare”, would you stay on the plane? So why would you go to work everyday without knowing what to do if you find yourself confronting the nightmare of an armed assailant intent on killing you and your co-workers? You may feel you’re not in danger and don’t need this training. But feelings are not a good predictor of these types of events. By the time you feel you’re in danger, it will be too late. And even if the odds are small, because the impact can be catastrophic, it’s only common sense to take at least basic steps to be ready. Areas Covered in the Session : Scope & Impact of Workplace Shootings Pre-Incident Warning Signs of Shooting Events Case studies of workplace shootings Using an “Active Shooter” Decision Tree What to do when law enforcement responds Who Should Attend: HR Departments Directors and VPs Facilities management Office managers Business owners

You may have heard that most employment is at-will, but what does that mean? If you employ your workers “at-will”, does that mean you can fire them whenever you want? Does invoking the employment-at-will doctrine protect you from wrongful termination lawsuit? Why You Should Attend: Many employers make the mistake of assuming that because they hired an employee “at-will”, terminating that employee will be a done deal—and they often end up defending a wrongful termination claim. Other employers may hold onto employees who are not performing well or who may even undermine company goals and safety, because they think that terminating them will automatically result in a multi-million dollar lawsuit. Neither of those assumptions is necessarily true! So what can an employer do? This webinar will help you gain some insight into how to navigate your relationship with your employees, keeping employment-at-will and its exceptions in mind. Learning Objectives: Attend the webinar to know: The extent and limits of Employment-at-Will. We will also explore the statutory exceptions and contractual provisions that seem to undermine at-will employment to give you clarity and guidance on an often misunderstood principle of employment law. The rights and obligations of employers and employees. Areas Covered in the Session : Defining Employment-at-Will Identifying situations falling outside of at-will employment Identifying exceptions to Employment-at-Will Anti-discrimination laws and Employment-at-Will Rights and obligations of employers and employees Employment agreements, disclaimers, written employment agreements Employee handbooks The NLRB and disclaimers Scope of Employment-at-Will Case examples Who Should Attend: CEOs Senior Managers Business Owners Hiring Managers All HR Professionals Recruiters VPs CFOs Comptrollers Compensation Specialists Compliance Officers

Generational differences have long been an important aspect of workplace diversity, and this is even more true now than even in the recent past. With the majority of the modern workforce consisting of members of four distinct generations – many of whom work in companies with outdated policies and ways of doing business established by previous generations – effective cross-generational workplace communication is an important key to success. Perfecting the art cross-generational communication in the workplace has to start with knowledge of what key generational differences are and why, and insight into how each generation – and the individuals within it – add value. This requires getting to know key differences among generations, including their formative influences, characteristics and workplace behaviors, as well as how to manage outside your own generation. Why Should you Attend: When people from different generations work side-by-side in the workplace, as they do every day, this poses unique workplace challenges, but it also sets the stage for tremendous opportunity as well. While the different generations don’t always see ‘eye-to-eye,’ bridging the generational divide can lead to greater innovation, productivity, effectiveness and – ultimately – competitive advantage. That’s the power that can come from leveraging the power and benefits of generational diversity. Participants will learn how and why the primary generations present in the 2019-20 workplace differ in terms of how they approach work, focused on understanding the value and contributions of each generation. Areas Covered in the Session : Overview of the 4 primary generations participating in the workplace in 2019-20 (millennials, generation X, generation Y, Baby Boomers) Impact of previous generation (traditionalists) on the current state of the workplace Understanding/clarifying what makes each generation unique, in terms formative influences, characteristics and workplace behaviors Tips for managing & working with individuals in other generations, both older and younger Practical tips for applying knowledge of generational differences to build a better workplace in 2019-20 Who Should Attend: HR Professionals (VPs, Directors, Managers, Specialists, Generalists, Business Partners, etc.) Employee relations professionals Talent management professionals Organizational development & organizational excellence professionals Managers Supervisors Executives Business owners

This course will teach you to speak in public without any fear to hold back your career or even without damaging your image, All of you can learn to give confident presentations after attending this session. You can give confident, clear, informative, and interesting presentations. Learn how to prepare for delivering deliberate and interesting messages that keep your listeners’ attention. After time, you may find its second nature. Never fear again speaking in public; giving presentations, or merely just speaking up in meetings. Learning to speak confidently in public will serve you well in all other areas of business as it becomes easy to automatically, and on the fly, craft succinct messages that will be heard and considered. We will teach you how to “fake it until you make it.” One day you’ll wonder where all the fear sprang from and maybe even find yourself coaching another speak’a’phobic that “It’s easy to speak in public.” Famously Jerry Seinfeld once said, “Surveys show that the #1 fear of Americans is public speaking. #2 is death. That means that at a funeral, the average American would rather be in the casket than doing the eulogy.” Embarrassment and failure when speaking in front of others is one of the greatest fears most people encounter in their careers. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Areas Covered in the Session : 12 tips that spell confidence (and what doesn’t) 12 tips for getting your message across 12 tips for preparing to speak 22 sure fire presentation tips Body language counts – what to do with yours Sure fire ways to quell your “speaking in public” nerves Differences between online (webinars and conference calls) vs in-person training and presentations Change your mindset = change your skills Easy things to do that will improve your speaking skills instantly Who Should Attend: Managers Branch Managers Store Managers HR Generalists HR Managers Management Business Owners

5S, which refers to the five Japanese words for clearing up, arrangement, neatness, discipline, and ongoing improvement, is a workplace organization system that also supports safety; the sixth S. It achieved proven results at the Ford Motor Company during the first quarter of the 20th century, where Henry Ford paid his cleaners the same high wage he paid his machine tool and assembly workers. This presentation will cover the application of 5S along with safety, including activities that promote workforce participation in safety; a central aspect of the ISO 45001:2018 occupational health and safety standard. Areas Covered in the Session : Most elements of 5S originated at the Ford Motor Company, where Henry Ford acknowledged its role in quality and productivity by paying cleaners as much as he paid production workers. A clean floor was a visual control that made abnormalities such as leaking oil, leaking hydraulic fluid, or dropped parts immediately obvious while convenient waste containers—a practice later adopted by Disney theme parks—kept the workplace free of litter. Cleanliness was among Ford’s three principles of management, and it delivered proven bottom line results. The lockout-tagout safety practice also was used by Ford 90 or more years ago. 5S means: Seiri (cleaning up) removes all unnecessary items from the shop floor Seiton (arranging): a place for everything, and everything in its place. This eliminates the need to search for parts and tools, and shadow boards have been used for more than 100 years. Workplace arrangement also removes waste motion, one of the Toyota production system’s Seven Wastes. Seiso (neatness) focuses on a clean workplace in which abnormalities have no place to hide. Shitsuke (discipline) makes the first three Ss routine, and adds preventive maintenance. Seiketsu (ongoing improvement) means looking for more opportunities to apply 5S. Safety: Henry Ford’s twelve key accident root causes are as applicable today as they were almost 100 years ago. Ford’s “Can’t rather than don’t” (engineering controls, error-proofing) safety principle takes five of them off the table immediately. The effectiveness of “can’t rather than don’t” has been proven on numerous occasions, with safety incident rates being reduced to the nice round number of zero. 5S eliminates two more root causes ISO 9001:2015 clause 7.1.4, Environment for Operation of Processes, eliminates two more. Clause 7.1.3, Infrastructure, eliminates two more. Availability of personal protective equipment (PPE) and dress codes that, for example, preclude loose clothing that can get caught in machinery, removes the last of the twelve root causes. With due credit to Agatha Christie, “And then there were none.” The takeaway is that off the shelf methods can suppress all twelve occupational health and safety incident root causes. The webinar will also cover safety audits, workplace safety committees, and the hiyari hatto (“Experience of almost accident situation”) report through which anybody can initiate corrective and preventive action (CAPA) for safety problems. These also support ISO 45001:2018. Who Should Attend: Quality Departments Saftey Departments Manufacturing Departments Engineering Departments Quality Technicians

This 90-minute webinar will guide you through the critical steps in ensuring strong controls for the Accounts Payable (AP) function and provide practical ‘how to’ guidance for minimizing your organization’s exposure to AP fraudsters. Why Should you Attend: According to the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, businesses suffer an average of $155,000 every time an insider commits fraud. More disturbing: Billing schemes are by far the most common fraud schemes threatening organizations, making up nearly one-third of the total. Adding to the problem, check fraud is rising at a rate of 25% per year and criminals are coming up with new high-tech ways of hijacking corporate ACH (Automated Clearing House) accounts. In this 90-minute session, participants will learn how to identify different varieties of AP-related fraud schemes damaging organizations of all kinds, including small businesses and non-profits. You will learn to determine how shrewd fraudsters abuse the AP process to embezzle funds for years before being detected and how to shorten the time before discovery. This training will enable you to quickly recognize the red flags of AP fraud in your operations and financial records and will assist in providing cost-effective anti-fraud controls to protect against the growing army of fraudsters both inside and outside your organizations. Learning Objectives: Conduct a quick and cost-effective fraud risk assessment for client AP operations Implement effective AP fraud detection techniques and build audit practices to detect red flags of AP fraud Implement best-practice anti-fraud control strategies for AP Advise management on fraud risk mitigation through transaction monitoring, technology/information technology tools and low-cost internal controls Recommend better anti-fraud management structure (Board of Directors/Executive Management, Line Management, Compliance, General Counsel, etc.)

Employers work hard to set up reward systems to hire, engage, reward and retain the best and brightest employees. However, such systems often have the effect of doing just the opposite. Performance management systems installed to support the rewards system don’t link to the rewards system and or even if in theory they do, are not communicated to the employees as such and so rewards become misaligned. Many employers find to their horror that through mismanaging of rewards they have wound up rewarding mediocrity, and even retaining “occupants.” Even worse is such reward going to low performing employees instead of the intended high performing employees. Exacerbating the problem is that such a system demotivates higher performing employees. Lastly, upon trying to change the system, leaders and even high performing employees become viewed as threats to long-term mediocre employees who will go to great lengths to derail any changes and sadly are often successful. Why You Should Attend: Are you as an employer rewarding mediocrity? Do you get pushback from low performers when you try to reward high performance? Is “goal” a four-letter word in your organization? Are you rewarding what someone should already be bringing to his or her job? Are you spending too much time dealing with the wrong things than paying attention to the right things? Because what you notice, praise, reward and pay attention to happens. Teamwork is good but good teamwork looks much different from a few propping up the many. Are you pulling down your high performers by making your eagles attempt to soar dragging turkeys? This webinar covers the processes, pitfalls and perils to linking rewards, goals, people, and leaders together with reward and performance systems without causing organizational havoc. Areas Covered in the Session : Rewards – Their role in employment The Dirty Dozen of linking rewards and pay to performance- you have to do them The Foundation of Disaster – How five things cause 90% of your people problems Managing non-compensable rewards Rewarding mediocrity – 12 things NOT to do Six crucial attributes for managers that used to be “nice to have” but are now “critical to have” When is training merely akin to putting lipstick on a pig and when it is a good solution The Occupancy Manager – Keeping them from spreading dysfunction Four crucial management tools – How and when to use each one Using goal based compensation to reward performance – not mediocrity OR occupancy Won’t we be sued? – How to use rewards as what they are, rewards, without causing compliance problems. Who Should Attend: Supervisors HR Associates HR Managers and Generalists Employee Relations Managers Plant Managers Business owners.

Professionals who communicate, negotiate, and persuade effectively have always been in a position to choose their own path in the workplace. Attend our webinar to learn how to handle the 4 most common and troublesome “assertiveness required” situations in the workplace; negotiations, emergencies, conflicts, and speaking in groups. Learn how to ask for information without seeming combative. Plan how to identify and present your options or opinions without arguing positions. Best of all, go home at the end of the day knowing you handled your day appropriately, confidently and competently and enjoy your time off without spoiling that time ruminating over the day’s details and interactions. Why You Should Attend: Do you dread asking for what you want in negotiations? Do you often replay your workday, wondering if you said or did the right thing? Do you agonize about determining if you are seen as assertive, and what is seen as aggressive? Do you feel underappreciated, discouraged, powerless, most days at work? Do you feel annoyed that no one ever seems to take you seriously? Or worse, takes advantage of you? Do you feel that when you do try to stand up for yourself that you go overboard? Do you wait until you are totally fed up… and then have a melt down? If you have trouble in the workplace with speaking and asserting yourself with self-confidence and professionalism, attend this webinar to learn how to value, celebrate and maximize your communication style to be as successful as you deserve to be in any workplace. Areas Covered in the Session : What exactly is assertive? How much is enough and how much is too much? Where’s the line and what is the difference? Managing emotional pressure – how to handle your cool at work when everyone else is losing theirs Dealing with people who “push your buttons” Tips for speaking in groups or in public to assure a confident impression Maximizing your natural communication differences to your advantage in solving problems, during conflicts, in negotiations and thorny situations Informational inquiry vs adversarial battle Strong communication skills: Active listening and assertive speaking Overcoming fear of negotiation Staying off the people and staying on the problem Aiming for a win/win outcome without giving up too much Who Should Attend: Managers Branch ManagersStore Store Managers HR Managers HR Generalists Management Business Owners

In this webinar learn how to write effective Job Descriptions and Person Specifications that identify all of the job requirements, and avoid discriminatory language. Writing effective Job Descriptions is one of the most effective ways to clarify expectations and measuring performances. Well-written and up-to-date job descriptions are critical when it comes to recruiting, promoting, and classifying employees; conducting performance reviews; and providing reasonable accommodations. Poorly written Job Descriptions can lead to potential legal issues, and missing out on hiring, training, and performance opportunities. It can be difficult to achieve full compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as well. Why You Should Attend: In today’s job market, attracting the right kind of talent to your company is both an art and a science. And it starts with creating compelling job descriptions that make qualified candidates want to work for you. To reach top candidates, your job descriptions must actively sell a position using compelling language that paints an authentic picture of the work-that’s the art. And leveraging the power of search engines, accurate titles and relevant keywords is a must-that’s the science. This topic will explain how to identify essential functions and write effective job descriptions that can be used to limit the risk of liability. Objectives of the Presentation: Write SEO-friendly job descriptions that land you better candidates Optimize job descriptions for on-the-go mobile users Provide a clear set of objectives to identify the most suitable candidate and what is really needed in the role Who is your audience? How do you identify essential functions? Why you must preserve flexibility? Prepare a Job Description to assist with performance management and identify training needs What to do before writing a Job Description and Person Specification? What to include in a Person Specification? Set out necessary skills, experience and qualifications in the Person Specification Preparing the Job Description for measuring performance Avoiding language that can lead to discrimination claims Why a job description is important to assessing reasonable accommodations? Consider health and safety obligations for inclusion in the Job Description How to use information for job evaluation and hiring? Areas Covered in the Session : Practical tips on review and update existing job descriptions-don’t simply rely on older versions Correctly and accurately draft job descriptions, so you can ensure they define exactly what the job is and define the “essential functions” of each position Use correct language and learn what to keep in and what to leave out Use job descriptions in assessing whether to hire or promote, based on an individual’s skill set Create job descriptions that will support you when you have to make a decision regarding ADA claims for accommodation or other issues Correctly classify employees and avoid legal issues regarding overtime Who Should Attend: Business Owners Managers Employers Human Resources Departments Accountants

How we talk about performance – how successful we are in doing this – is critical to the team relationships we forge and the effectiveness of team performance. Part of talking about performance is knowing how to have an effective performance discussion. The performance discussion is truly a collaborative process that we have – there must be an open exchange of views, ideas, and issues. The primary purpose of the discussion is to provide specific feedback concerning performance, to explain and gain mutual understanding of the ratings you have given, and to build a sound foundation for goal setting and development planning for the next year. Specifically, the purpose of the Collaborative Performance Discussion is: To provide feedback to the Team Member concerning performance To clarify for the Team Member individual strengths and areas needing development To discuss and gain mutual understanding of the ratings assigned and achieve closure To help the Team Member structure a Career Development Plan for the next year that will result in continued more effective and significant improved performance During this webinar, we will discuss some of the challenges of the Collaborative Performance Discussion, provide you with an opportunity to self-assess your discussion skills, and introduce you to the Coaching for Performance Model. Why You Should Attend: The primary reason for participating in this webinar is to ensure that you build effective collaborative relationships. For your management of team performance to be successful, you must overcome a number of critical challenges. Success in this case means that both you and your Team Member leave the discussion feeling that the process was fair, objective, helpful, and sets the stage for continued effective performance. Specifically, this webinar will help you to meet the challenges that you are facing including: Structuring a performance message that conveys a supportive tone, presents the evaluation in easy-to-understand terms, is fair and able to be supported and sustains a good working relationship Setting the stage for the discussion by creating a supportive environment Providing clear and relevant feedback Effectively handling disagreements when they arise Achieving mutual understanding of performance ratings, strengths, and development needs and achieving closure Areas Covered in the Session : Having a Collaborative Performance Discussion Challenges of the Collaborative Performance Discussion The Coaching for Performance Model Preparing for the discussion Providing Feedback Establish Mutual Understanding and Achieve Closure Who Should Attend: This webinar is suitable for professionals across all industries and functions. A must for all Directors, VP’s, Managers, Supervisors, Team Leads and everyone who may want to improve their ability to effectively manage performances.

Why You Should Attend: Employers should know how long to keep or destroy employee records and documents. Each state and federal agency has a different set of requirements, often covering the same documents so it’s challenging for you to know what to keep and for how long. These issues, as well as new identity theft threats and updated technology, impact your recordkeeping practices in a big way. This webinar will guide you through those requirements so you understand how to ensure compliance and understand the consequences of noncompliance. The webinar will also outline record retention requirements and notification requirements for several federal laws. By following the requirements, your institution should be able to avoid the pitfalls in employment-related liabilities and problems, if and when auditors investigate your files. Objectives of the Presentation: Review the recordkeeping requirements of key employment laws to get familiar with the basic rules Is there a legal requirement for keeping this document? What laws come into play regarding your obligations to manage personnel records? In what form must a document be stored? Electronically? In its original paper form? How long should I keep this document if I think its usefulness is over – and how can I know that for sure? How to effectively weed out what you no longer need to retain — and why keeping everything can be just as dangerous as keeping nothing at all Best practices for backing up and destroying employment records so you don’t compromise any sensitive, personal data How to make your recordkeeping system easy to track and use, regardless of whether you keep a paper or electronic trail Tips for making a smooth paper to e-records filing system transition How to respond in the event the DOL, EEOC, or another federal or state agency comes knocking to investigate your recordkeeping practices Policies employees must follow, consequences of not following them, and documentation required to substantiate your actions Areas Covered in the Session : Introduction highlighting the importance of records and notices and discussion on retention, storage, and destruction of records Understanding of the new reporting requirements and compliance schedule Record retention systems that work best for compliance with changing requirements Discussion on other tasks that require complete and accurate documentation Understand notice requirements to be aware of what notices need to be posted and how to post them in compliance with the laws Case studies on documentation Overview of basic documents in several federal employment laws – Importance of documentation in defending Title VII cases What information does the government require you to keep for overtime cases How to use documentation to prove FLSA exemptions Documents and notification for FMLA and ADA leave Documentation in defend trade secrets act Who Should Attend: Payroll Departments Human resource recordkeeping and maintenance Compliance Officers CFOs Office Managers Company Presidents Employers and Business Owners Hiring Managers HR Managers/Supervisors Risk Managers Potential Managers Department Heads HR Professionals Employee Benefits Professionals

The Webinar will discuss the importance of preparing for and participating in a computer system validation audit by regulatory agencies. Regulatory agencies fully expect companies to comply with the computer system validation guidelines that were established in 1983 and have evolved over the last thirty years to align with changes in technology and best practices developed by industry, including the inclusion of risk assessment as a critical component of validation. Validation of computer systems in the regulatory environment must be a continuous rather than a discrete process. When auditing, regulatory agencies will expect you to have adequately planned and executed your computer system validation effort, and continue to maintain your system in a validated state. There are specific best practices to be followed that will ensure you are fully prepared to defend your program and prove that you have thoroughly validated your computer systems that are subject to regulatory scrutiny. Being prepared will ensure a much easier interaction with the regulatory agency and will minimize the time and cost of the audit. A company’s readiness may also minimize the risk of findings and citations by showing the auditors that you have done due diligence and are able to respond adequately to all questions and requests for information in a timely manner. Areas Covered in the Session : Describe the key components and importance of regulatory audits of validated computer systems Discuss best practices for preparing for a computer system validation audit by a regulatory agency Provide examples of the documentation you can prepare to minimize risk and ensure your audit is successful Discuss best practices for participating in a computer system validation audit by a regulatory agency Provide examples of what you can do during the audit to minimize risk, time and overall cost Discuss best practices for developing a positive relationship with regulatory agency auditors and building a reputation for preparedness, thoroughness and integrity Interactive Q&A Session Who Will Benefit: This webinar is intended for those working in FDA-regulated industries, including pharmaceutical, medical device, biological, animal health and tobacco. Functions that are applicable include research and development, manufacturing, Quality Control, distribution, clinical testing and management, adverse events management and post-marketing surveillance. You should attend this webinar if you are responsible for planning, executing or managing the implementation of any system governed by FDA regulations, or if you are maintaining or supporting such a system. Examples of who will benefit from this webinar include: Compliance and Audit Managers Information Technology Analysts Information Technology Developers and Testers QC/QA Managers and Analysts Clinical Data Managers and Scientists Analytical Chemists Laboratory Managers Automation Analysts Computer System Validation Specialists GMP Training Specialists Business Stakeholders/Subject Matter Experts Business System/Application Testers